“An Introduction to Biological Illustration: Its History, Uses, and Some Methods”: workshop at University Art Museum Saturday

image for Cardillo exhibition

Rimer Cardillo, Wasp, digital carbon pigment print, ca. 1974, printed 2011.

“An Introduction to Biological Illustration: Its History, Uses, and Some Methods,” a workshop with Marla Coppolino, Cornell Center for Technology Enterprise and Commercialization, will be held from 1-5 p.m. Saturday, March 2, in the University Art Museum. Cost is $20 ($5 for students). To register in advance for this event, call 607-777-2634.

The workshop is being held in conjunction with the temporary exhibition, “Quiet Cruelties: Prints, Sculpture, and Unique Works on Paper by Rimer Cardillo,” on view through March 23. The exhibition is on display through March 23. Admission to the museum is free. For directions and museum hours visit http://artmuseum.binghamton.edu.

Advertisements

Graduate Student Activities: Dengyan Zhou

Doctoral candidate Dengyan Zhou has just returned from a field trip to China, where she carried out primary archival research and gathered uncollected materials for her dissertation, “The Language of ‘Photography’ in China: A Genealogy of Conceptual Frames from Sheying to Xinwen sheying and Jishi sheying.” One of her primary goals was to interview surviving participants in the momentous changes that swept through China, transforming its photographic culture in the middle years of the twentieth century. Here she is in January, in Taiyuan, interviewing eighty-four year old Gu Di, who, during the period of the Sino-Japanese War and the Civil War that followed, was filing clerk in the office of Jin-Cha-Ji Pictorial, the journal that shaped photographic practice in the Communist-led democratic areas and, later, in the People’s Republic of China. The three-day interview provided Dengyan with important historical details concerning the establishment and management of the journal’s photographic operations, the professional training of its photographers, the circulation of photographs, and the journal’s relationships with other organs of Communist communications in the years between 1942 and 1949. Gu Di also generously provided Dengyan with documentary materials and photographs from his own collection that bring vividly to life the understudied history of this period of photographic production in China.

Zhou Dengyan with Gu Di

Zhou Dengyan with Gu Di

Gu Di in his study and bedroom-1

Gu Di in his study and bedroom

Faculty Activities: Tom McDonough at dOCUMENTA (13)

Screen shot 2013-02-25 at 8.49.02 AM

On June 13, Associate Professor and Chair Tom McDonough participated in dOCUMENTA (13) in Kassel, Germany, presenting a talk on the conferences of the Situationist International (SI) for a session called “The Artists’ Congresses: A Congress.” Please see the panel description below. While in Kassel, McDonough was also interviewed about his work on the SI by kunstundfilm; follow the link to view a video of the conversation.

During the first week after the public opening of dOCUMENTA (13), June 11 – 15, 2012, The Artists’ Congresses: A Congress gathers artists and scholars from the fields of art history, philosophy, and cultural studies to address questions related to the history of the artist’s voice. A series of five events delve into the genealogy of public institutional programming and the nature of the congress format as a platform for the production of meaning. Following a brief introduction to the day’s subject, the speakers present significant cases from the history of artists’ ideological and public congresses throughout the twentieth century, concluding with a roundtable discussion followed by an open Q & A session.

With the emergence of these platforms for artists, which evolved in tandem with the historical avant gardes, a new social reading and perception of  the artist developed: as producer rather than as outsider, genius, bohemian, or academic. These terms referring to the artist as an exception were replaced by a vision of the artist as an active participant in the construction of the social body. If the salon had earlier been the semi-public place in which conversations were activated, feeding the need of the upper classes to regard themselves as both patrons and receivers of artistic activity, the avant-garde positioned the street as a space and the artist as a maker of a new collective mind. This was a turning point where the subjective voice of the artist presented itself and its knowledge in a different arena: the meeting, and even the congress. A new syndicate of forces, as well as a different way of understanding the role and function of speech, and therefore language, started to appear in the realm of art exhibition.

How do the different morphologies, from the free academies that were initiated by artists from the late 1960s on, to the many temporary structures that they are inventing in order to present works and ideas today, affect the institutional life of art? How do they relate to the emergence—starting in the mid-1960s—of specific museum departments dedicated to the production of “parallel” discursive events? How does the programming of talks and conferences as part as the exhibition context, as documenta has done from its very first edition in 1955, affect the reception of art?

Graduate Student Activities: Rotem Rozental

Pinchas Cohen Gan, “Standard Religious Art,” 2012, oil and acrylic on canvas, 70 x 50”.

Pinchas Cohen Gan, “Standard Religious Art,” 2012, oil and acrylic on canvas, 70 x 50”. Image courtesy of artforum.com.

Please follow the links to read doctoral student Rotem Rozental’s recent reviews for artforum.com on Pinchas Cohen Gan at the Tel Aviv Museum of Art and Oren Eliav at the Braverman Gallery. Rotem will also present her paper “Framing an Emergency: Photography in Areas of Conflict” at the symposium “Theorizing the Web,” to be held at the CUNY Graduate Center on March 1-2. Follow the link for more information.

“An Entomologist Considers Art”: gallery talk at University Art Museum today

image for Cardillo exhibition

Rimer Cardillo, Wasp, digital carbon pigment print, ca. 1974, printed 2011.

The University Art Museum will feature “An Entomologist Considers Art,” a gallery talk with biology professor Julian Shepherd at noon on Tuesday, Feb. 19, in FA-213. The talk, held in conjunction with the temporary exhibition, “Quiet Cruelties: Prints, Sculpture, and Unique Works on Paper by Rimer Cardillo,” is free and open to the public.

The exhibition is on display through March 23. Admission to the museum is free. For directions and museum hours visit http://artmuseum.binghamton.edu.