Winter Session Courses

Still searching for the right course for the winter session? Consider ARTH 286B, ARTH 286S or ARTH 288A!

European Architecture, 1700-1850– 10001 – ARTH 286B – 01  Instructor: Chris Balsiger

“Form follows function” is an idea most often associated with the 20th century’s modernist architecture, but its roots in fact go much deeper. Beginning in the 18th century, architecture shifted from the preoccupations of traditional aesthetics to modern demands of utility and efficiency. After 1700, architecture’s identity began to be seen as an urgent question not only for architects but also for government officials, doctors, entrepreneurs, and philosophers. With the simultaneous development of capitalism and discourses of rationalism and empiricism, new needs were established and program became paramount. Under the demands of “efficiency,” “hygiene,” and “surveillance,” architects were called upon to give form to specialized facilities such as hospitals, asylums, prisons, factories, and housing for the poor. We will examine the emergence of this “functionalist” paradigm, situating our discussion in the broader context of the social upheavals of the 18th-century Enlightenment, industrialization, and French Revolution, and follow their development through the middle of the 19th century. Prerequisites: None. Course Notes: Freshmen welcome. All majors welcome. For Art History majors, this course fulfills the Pre-1800 200-level art or architecture course requirement.
Associated Term: Winter 2014
Registration Dates: Oct 28, 2013 to Jan 07, 2014
Levels: Undergraduate
General Education: A – Aesthetic Perspective

God and Empire: Constantine and the Imperial Church – 10002 – ARTH 286S – 01  Instructor: Melissa Fitzmaurice

In 313, the Roman emperor Constantine legalized Christianity and brought what was once considered a “church of poverty” under his imperial protection. His political and monetary support of Christianity—visible in the massive basilicas and luxurious gifts he donated to the church—has led some scholars to consider Constantine the first Christian emperor. And yet, Constantine managed to maintain control of an empire populated by mostly non-Christians. Using the evidence of Constantine’s monumental building programs in Rome and in Constantinople, this course will investigate Constantine’s possible political, economic, and spiritual motives for legalizing and supporting Christianity in Rome. We will also discuss Constantine’s maintenance of conflicting identities as Roman and as Christian in order to unravel his larger project of maintaining control of a diverse and expansive empire. Prerequisites: None. Course Notes: Freshmen welcome. All majors welcome. For Art History majors, this course meets the Pre-1800 200-level art or architecture course requirement.
Associated Term: Winter 2014
Registration Dates: Oct 28, 2013 to Jan 07, 2014
Levels: Undergraduate
General Education: A – Aesthetic Perspective

Governing Bodies: Photography in the Middle East– 10003 – ARTH 288A – 01  Instructor: Rotem Rozental

This course originates from the intersections of photographic practices, archival machinery, nationalism and civic engagement, as these unfold in the conflicted recent history of the Middle East. Our point of entry to these issues will be the status of the body in private, institutional and public photographic archives. We will view photographic albums of European travellers in the region during the late 19th century, focusing on representations of the male body. We will then move to Zionist photographic archives that appeared in Palestine in the 1920s and examine how they tried to define, differentiate and categorize local bodies. Freshmen and all majors welcome. For Art History majors, this course meets the Post-1800 200-level art course requirement.
Associated Term: Winter 2014
Registration Dates: Oct 28, 2013 to Jan 07, 2014
Levels: Undergraduate
General Education: A – Aesthetic Perspective, G – Global Interdependencies

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