Next VizCult: Cağatay Doğan, Binghamton University, TODAY

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Abstract: This talk will examine the visual construction of place and the identity of Istanbul by the Turkish Republic’s “state photographer” of the 1930s, Othmar Pferschy. State-sponsored publications promoted the republican regime’s aspirations to create a modern nation. Istanbul photographs played a crucial role in domesticating the Ottoman past as landscape and museum in contrast to the iconic modernist spaces of Ankara. Pferschy’s private archive and the rising photojournalism of the 1950s provides us with an opportunity to explore the fate of the republican visual regime of amnesia and iconization, in the broader context of transition to a multiparty system, the rise of mass media, and rapid urbanization.

Faculty and Graduate Activities: John Tagg, Dengyan Zhou, and Rotem Rozental in British Art Studies

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Issue 4 of the refereed on-line journal British Art Studies, published by the Paul Mellon Center in London and the Yale Center for British Art, has just gone live. It includes contributions by John Tagg, SUNY Distinguished Professor of Art History, and Dengyan Zhou (PhD 2016) to a debate on photographic practice and theory at times of crisis, together with the entire proceedings of the recent conference on “Photography and Britishness” Tagg co-organized, including the outstanding presentation by current doctoral candidate Rotem Rozental. 

 

Graduate Activities: Debora Faccion in Hyperallergic

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Nomes dos Mortos (Names of the Dead) from Nuno Ramos’s 111 Vigília, Canto, Leitura, 2016 (via 111 Vigília).

Congratulations to doctoral candidate Debora Faccion, whose article on Nuno Ramos, titled “An Artist Remembers a Prison Massacre in Brazil, Where Police Impunity Reigns” has recently been published in Hyperallergic:

From November 1st to the 2nd, the artist Nuno Ramos held a 24-hour vigil in São Paulo for the 111 people killed in the Carandiru massacrein 1992. The November dates marked the passage from the Day of All Saints to the Day of the Dead, and coincided with the numbers 11-1. The massacre, one of the major violations of human rights in Brazil, was carried out by the police in reaction to a prisoner revolt in the Carandiru Penitentiary in São Paulo. After many years of impunity, in 2013 and 2014, 74 policemen involved in the massacre were convicted to hundreds of years in prison. However, the trial that sentenced the policemen was repealed in September, aggravating the sense of injustice and senseless violence perpetrated by the police in São Paulo today.

Click here to read more.

Next VizCult: Cağatay Doğan, Binghamton University

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Abstract: This talk will examine the visual construction of place and the identity of Istanbul by the Turkish Republic’s “state photographer” of the 1930s, Othmar Pferschy. State-sponsored publications promoted the republican regime’s aspirations to create a modern nation. Istanbul photographs played a crucial role in domesticating the Ottoman past as landscape and museum in contrast to the iconic modernist spaces of Ankara. Pferschy’s private archive and the rising photojournalism of the 1950s provides us with an opportunity to explore the fate of the republican visual regime of amnesia and iconization, in the broader context of transition to a multiparty system, the rise of mass media, and rapid urbanization.

Graduate Activities: Mariah Postlewait and Lauren Cesiro

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Congratulations to doctoral students Mariah Postlewait and Lauren Cesiro, who have been selected as HASTAC (Humanities, Arts, Science, and Technology Alliance and Collaboratory) Scholars for 2016-18: 

The HASTAC Scholars fellowship program is an innovative student-driven community of graduate and undergraduate students. Each year a new cohort is accepted into the program. More than 800 HASTAC Scholars in dozens of disciplines have been sponsored by 145 colleges and universities–ranging from small liberal arts colleges to large Research 1 institutions. We are building a community of students working at the intersection of technology and the arts, humanities and sciences.

Faculty Activities: Nancy Um in Berlin

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The Barenboim-Said Akademie, Berlin, Germany.

This weekend, Associate Professor Nancy Um will be presenting the paper “Aromatics, Stimulants, and their Vessels: The Material Culture and Rites of Merchant Interaction in Eighteenth-Century Mocha” at the conference The Mercantile Effect: On Art and Exchange in the Islamicate World During 17th–18th Centuriesheld at the Barenboim-Said Akademie in Berlin. For the complete program, click here.

 

Faculty Activities: John Tagg at the Yale Center for British Art

screen-shot-2016-10-19-at-11-18-24-amOn November 30, Distinguished Professor of Art History John Tagg will deliver the Andrew Carnduff Ritchie Lecture at the Yale Center for British Art, titled “‘Knocking around between money, sex, and boredom’: Walker Evans in Havana and New York.” The lecture series, jointly sponsored by the Yale Center for British Art and the Yale University Art Gallery, was established to honor the memory of Andrew Carnduff Ritchie, director of the Gallery from 1957 to 1971. The event will be live streamed.

The title comes from a short memoir of his arrival in Havana written by Walker Evans in July 1933, after returning from a thirty-day trip to Cuba. Evans was recalling his first meeting with his guides, the Fernandez de Castro brothers, but his phrase encapsulates much about his own life at this time, raising issues invariably kept at bay in writing on Evans that have an undeniable if hard to focus relation to the understanding of his photographic work from this period. Moving between Havana and New York City, the lecture will ask not just about the passage between work and biography, but about sex and work and what is secured in the refusal to speak about them when looking at photographs by Evans.

Born in the northeast of England and trained at the Royal College of Art in London, John Tagg writes on forms of photographic practice not previously considered part of the history of photography, including police and prison photography, social surveillance, urban records, and other archival systems in which the photograph is made to serve as a document. From here, his interests have extended to the ways we construct histories of cultural technologies and visual regimes, and to the theoretical debates that have transformed the history of art and photography since the 1970s. Tagg, the author of The Burden of Representation (1988) and The Disciplinary Frame (2009), among other books, is spending the fall semester at Yale as the Andrew Carnduff Ritchie visiting scholar.