The Path of Tolerance: September 29-October 9

Path of Tolerance Poster Sept 17-1

Binghamton University will host The Path of Tolerance, a sponsored public art exhibition featuring over 90 works of art from contributors worldwide. The exhibition will be on view from Sept. 29 through Oct. 9, on the Lois B. DeFleur walkway, between the Glenn G. Bartle Library and the Fine Arts Building, on campus. Binghamton will be the first major institution to present the full Tolerance collection in the United States, and the first to exhibit the pieces directly on the ground. This public exhibition originated from a larger project initiated by renowned graphic designer and illustrator Mirko Ilić, who will lead an opening tour of the exhibition at 2 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 29 on the Lois B. DeFleur walkway. This growing exhibition – initially starting with just 21 pieces and now boasting 93 – features artwork based on the theme of tolerance. Each artist is only given dimensions and minimal instructions to follow. Their piece must include their signature, the name of their country and the word “tolerance” in their own language. To make this exhibition possible at Binghamton University, Blazo Kovacevic, associate professor of art and design, selected an appropriate location and printed the images onto specially made outdoor material. Prints will be installed directly onto the pavement as stickers along the Lois B. DeFleur walkway for students to see while walking to class. Families and alumni will be able to see the artwork as well, as the exhibition is running through Family Weekend and Alumni Week.

Other collaborators have shown similar exhibitions all over the world. In Turkey prints were installed in a mall, in Madrid they hung off an overpass, and in Slovenia images were enlarged to fill billboards throughout the city.

For further information, contact Blazo Kovacevic at bkovacev@binghamton.edu. This
exhibition is organized by Binghamton University Department of Art and Design and is
supported by the Elsie Rosefsky Memorial Endowment.

Advertisements

Today: Nancy Um to speak in the CEMERS Lecture Series, Wed, Sept 12

Bottle, Glass with enamel and gilding, 1725-1750, Gujarat, Height :13.2 cm, Base: 6.2 x 6.2 cm, LACMA, M.88.129.203. Image in the public domain.

Nancy Um will deliver a lecture entitled, “Imam al-Mutawakkil’s Box: Aromatic Gifts around the Late-Seventeenth- and Early-Eighteenth-Century Indian Ocean,” in the CEMERS Lecture Series. The lecture will be held on September 12, 2018 at 3 pm in LN 1106 (IASH Conference Room).

Lecture Abstract: In this talk, I will explore the significance of a corpus of square-based, mold-blown, and gilded glass vessels that were made in India in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries and have been cast under the wider rubric of “Mughal glass.” By connecting these decorated flasks to similar containers made of porcelain in Japan, we may understand the key role that they played as gifts, filled with aromatic oils, packaged in custom-made boxes, and delivered to recipients around the Indian Ocean. Rather than isolated items of decorative interest, these highly mobile, much-dispersed, and valuable gifts of glass and porcelain comprised parts of assemblages that were deployed strategically across the extended commercial networks of the Dutch overseas empire.

Jeffrey Kirkwood in Posthumanism in the Age of Humanism (Bloomsbury)

Posthumanism in the Age of Humanism (Bloomsbury)

“Vertiginous Systems of the Soul”

The article returns to Kant’s student, Marcus Herz, who was the first to publish a work dedicated to the philosophical-medical problem of vertigo and disorientation. Herz’s treatise on disorientation forced a confrontation with a decidedly computer-age problem: how the operations of material systems could produce coherent, second-order, ontological unities. As Kirkwood argues, the long-overlooked answer to this question offered by Herz only became comprehensible following advances in digital computing and machine learning during the twentieth century by figures such as Marvin Minsky. It is for this reason that Kirkwood contends that Herz should be seen as illuminating posthumanistic concerns that were lurking in the very foundations of humanism.

Nancy Um to speak in the CEMERS Lecture Series, Wed, Sept 12

Bottle, Glass with enamel and gilding, 1725-1750, Gujarat, Height :13.2 cm, Base: 6.2 x 6.2 cm, LACMA, M.88.129.203. Image in the public domain.

Nancy Um will deliver a lecture entitled, “Imam al-Mutawakkil’s Box: Aromatic Gifts around the Late-Seventeenth- and Early-Eighteenth-Century Indian Ocean,” in the CEMERS Lecture Series. The lecture will be held on September 12, 2018 at 3 pm in LN 1106 (IASH Conference Room).
Lecture Abstract: In this talk, I will explore the significance of a corpus of square-based, mold-blown, and gilded glass vessels that were made in India in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries and have been cast under the wider rubric of “Mughal glass.” By connecting these decorated flasks to similar containers made of porcelain in Japan, we may understand the key role that they played as gifts, filled with aromatic oils, packaged in custom-made boxes, and delivered to recipients around the Indian Ocean. Rather than isolated items of decorative interest, these highly mobile, much-dispersed, and valuable gifts of glass and porcelain comprised parts of assemblages that were deployed strategically across the extended commercial networks of the Dutch overseas empire.

Jeffrey Kirkwood in the ZMK (Zeitschrift für Medien- und Kulturforschung)

“The Technological Fact of Counterfactuals

Abstract: Optical media were instrumental in transforming the conception of facts, objectivity, and the “real.” This paper considers their role in structuring understandings of counterfactuals and states that could not be real. By returning to Ernst Mach’s photographic ballistics experiments, writing on thought experiments (a term he coined), and his dispute with Max Planck about the nature of the Weltbild, the article shows that, despite his legacy as a positivist, Mach’s epistemology of mechanical images opened a legitimate space of indeterminacy, contingency, and counterfactuality.

Marcia Focht presents at EVA 2018 Florence

Marcia Focht, Curator of Visual Resources, contributed the paper “Maximizing Metadata; Embedded Metadata Tools” at EVA (Electronic Imaging and the Visual Arts) in Florence, Italy, May 9-10.

The EVA Florence conference brought together about 100 speakers and participants to exchange ideas, spotlight initiatives, and share experiences on current trends in international arts computing and cultural heritage sector developments. Sponsored by an impressive array of Italian government, industry, foundation, and university entities–from the Associazione Beni Italiani Patrimonio Mondiale Unesco to Fratelli Alinari Idea to the Universita di Firenze–scholars and professionals came from as far afield as Austria, Finland, France, Germany, Turkey, Russia, Japan, the UK, and USA, with strong representation from the various regions of Italy.  The proceedings are published in an open-access PDF.

Lavinia Ciuffa, Marcia Focht, and Spyros Koulouris

Following the conference, Marcia and another EVA presenter from the USA, Maureen Burns from Archivision, connected with Visual Resources Association International Chapter members–Lavinia Ciuffa from the American Academy in Rome and Spyros Koulouris of I Tatti in Florence–to visit the extensive and historic archives, libraries, and grounds of Bernard Berenson’s Tuscan villa (now a Harvard Research Center) and Palazzo Grifoni to see the Photothek des Kunsthistorischen Instituts in Florenz–Max Planck Institut hosted by Dr. Ute Dercks.

I Tatti

display at Photothek des Kunsthistorischen Instituts

 

Nancy Um participates in the CUNY Digital Humanities Research Institute

Photo from Wikipedia Commons

Post content: In June 2018, Nancy Um will join 15 other participants in the CUNY Digital Humanities Research Institute, a ten-day residential workshop supported by the NEH and focused on expanding communities of digital humanities practice. More information on the CUNY DHRI can be found here: http://dhinstitutes.org/about.html