CfP: People, Places, and Things in the Global Eighteenth Century

Image: Francisca Efigenia Meléndez y Durazzo, Portrait of a a Seated Girl Holding Flowers, ca. 1795, tempera on ivory, 5 × 5 cm (Dallas: Meadows Museum, SMU, MM.08.01.20).

Nancy Um is chairing a research panel at the conference “Art and Architecture in the Long Eighteenth Century: HECAA at 25,” November 1-4, 2018, held at Southern Methodist University, and currently accepting proposals for presentations. See the panel abstract and submission details below.

Research Panel: People, Places, and Things in the Global Eighteenth Century
Increasingly broad in its definition, the “global eighteenth century” is often used to point to the widened geographic scope of the field, particularly in instances of visual exchange that push past perceived cultural boundaries or hinge upon the movement of artists, art objects, and visual practices across extended distances. This panel aspires to a more rigorous notion of the global eighteenth century: one that questions stable and enduring associations between people, places, and things; examines interactions, movements, and exchanges that are multi-sited rather than binary; and/or takes into account the structures and institutions that facilitated, but also encumbered, eighteenth-century travel, trade, and exchange. Please submit a proposal using this form by February 7, 2018.
 
More information on the HECAA conference can be found here.
Advertisements

Na’ama Klorman-Eraqi (PhD, ’13) presents at “Art & Activism” conference in The Netherlands

Na’ama Klorman-Eraqi, Art History PhD 2013 and currently affiliated with the Department of Art History at Tel Aviv University (Israel), delivered a talk on “Agitating Public Space: Affective Encounters with Feminist and Punk Cultural Strategies” at the “Art & Activism: Resilience Techniques in Times of Crisis” conference, December 13-15, 2017, at the Research Center for Material Culture, Museum Volkenkunde, in Leiden, The Netherlands. For more information, see https://artandactivismcon.wordpress.com/

Border Arts Workshop’s traveling exhibition “La Linea Quebrada/The Broken Line” installed in University Art Museum

The Broken Line/La Linea Quebrada
After thirty years, the Border Arts Workshop’s traveling exhibition La Linea Quebrada/The Broken Line emerges from its silver box to grace the walls of the Binghamton University Art Museum. The recently acquired work, which deals with the experience of the Mexican American border and the border crossing expressions of Chicano/a popular culture, will be on show until January 20, 2018, in an installation curated by History doctoral student, Juanita Rodriguez, who will also deliver two gallery talks on Friday 8 December at 11:00 a.m. and 12 noon.

New Course: ARTH 287R (01) Art Inc.

Register Now!

Distance Learning 4-Credit Winter Session Course

Dec 18, 2017 – January 12, 2018

ARTH 287R (01)

 Art Inc.

Beginning with the corporation itself, in its postwar incarnation, this course examines the ways that artists and designers have intervened within the sphere of corporate culture – either by helping to shape its image through logo design and advertising – or by pushing against it as the case may be, such as Hans Haacke’s critique of Mobil sponsorship at the Museum of Modern Art. We go on to examine what we might call the “postmodern” corporation and the age of digital technologies, questioning how the subversive impulses of Paris in ’68 became folded into a new corporate culture, exemplified in the tendency of advertising to appropriate contemporary art. Or, how artists such as Damien Hirst, Takashi Murakami, and Jeff Koons turned themselves into corporations – the “branded” artist as it were – as well as the Conceptual play with that conceit in groups like Readymades Belong to Everyone. We conclude with a closer look at activist groups like the Yes Men who attempt to subvert that impulse.

Course Fulfills:

Harpur W – Writing Credit

A – Aesthetic Perspective Credit

Gen Ed Credit

Instructor: Wylie Schwartz

Department of Art History