Undergraduate Activities: Nate Craig at the SUNY New Paltz Undergraduate Art History Symposium

 

Art History and Mathematical Sciences major Nate Craig will be presenting a paper on Saturday, April 10th, at the third annual SUNY New Paltz Undergraduate Art History Symposium:

Etruscan Pigments: A Chronological Examination

Often when viewing art of ancient cultures, we tend to see exactly what’s given, a story, and try to piece together the puzzle of their culture that way. The same can be said of Etruscan art as a large part of Etruscan art is the story it tells us about what Etruscans valued and how they interacted as a culture. However, if we take a different vantage point and look a little deeper into how the art itself is made, namely the pigments being used, we can create a different story about how they are creating these works–specifically, the chronology of pigments in Etruscan society. The development of the Etruscan palette changes over time due to the introduction of new pigments during the Orientalizing, Archaic, Classical and Hellenistic. These insights into the use of pigments do tell us how they are making these fantastic works but, more importantly, are an integral part of the larger puzzle of understanding the Etruscan culture. This might mean understanding how they valued certain figures or who might have been important. These kinds of answers have been made possible by using technology like multi-spectral imaging, x-ray diffraction and x-ray fluorescence. Through these methods we are beginning to understand Etruscan culture better and painting a clearer picture of the Etruscan palette and its uses. Thus, by combining science with art we can then better comprehend the Etruscan culture.

Art History majors Nathan Goldberg and Emily Jelen in Alpenglow

Congratulations to Art History majors Emily Jelen (’19) and Nathan Goldberg (’20), whose work has been published in the most recent volume of Alpenglow, the Binghamton University Undergraduate Journal of Research and Creative Activity. The volume features Goldberg’s essay “Picturing a Pandemic: Zoe Leonard’s Analogue” and Jelen’s Summer Scholars research project “Moorish Revival Synagogue Architecture: Community and Style, Past and Present.” The journal is published annually and is blind reviewed by Binghamton University’s faculty, staff, and advanced graduate students.

Undergraduate Activities: Congratulations to our 2020 graduates!

Art History faculty, students, and families celebrate the graduates with a Zoom toast on May 17, 2020.

  The Art History department congratulates this year’s graduating BA students!

Alyssa Abesamis

Denilson Alvarez

Jess Brody

Nathan Goldberg

Aliza Hornblass

Emily Jelen

Nikhil Jani

Veronica Liszewski

Claire McLagan

Thomas Pellegrino

Caelum Rogers

Kelly Ryan

John James Santiago

Undergraduate Activities: Caelum Rogers at the SUNY New Paltz Undergraduate Art History Symposium

Art History major Caelum Rogers will be presenting a paper on April 18 at the second annual SUNY New Paltz Undergraduate Art History Symposium:

A Century of Photography: History of Japanese Photographic Expression in the Past 100 Years and the Legacy of Realism in Post-War Japan

This presentation aims to situate the exhibition, A Century of Photography: History of Japanese Photographic Expression in the Past 100 Years, held in Tokyo in 1968, within the larger context of twentieth-century debates in Japan on the nature and role of photographic realism. It examines the central roles played by Taki Koji and Nakahira Takuma in shaping the way that the history of Japanese photography was presented in the exhibition, and the close relationship between that history and the larger photo-critical project Taki and Nakahira pursued in their short-lived photo-magazine, Provoke. Tracing the development of realist photographic aesthetics in the period before 1945, the presentation seeks to show how that aesthetic laid the basis for the dominant forms of post-war Japanese photography. It was an aesthetic challenged, however, by Taki and Nakahira, and analysis of the structure of the 1968 exhibition shows that the exhibition’s narrative of history directly engaged contemporary aesthetic and political debates around photography through Taki and Nakahira’s use of nineteenth-century archival photography to critique Japanese photography’s claims to truth and to offer a radically different understanding of photographic realism.

Student-Curated Exhibitions Reception

Thursday, October 3
6:00-7:00 pm
Binghamton University Art Museum – Lower Galleries (FA 179)

Join us for the opening reception of our student-curated exhibitions in the Binghamton University Art Museum lower galleries! Students will give a brief talk about their curatorial work followed by a Q & A session with the audience. Light refreshments will be served. Event is free and open to the public.

Event is co-sponsored by the Undergraduate Art History Association  

 

Undergraduate Activities: Congratulations to our 2019 graduates!

L-R: Emily Greenberg, Annemarie Maag-Tanchak, and Erin Livingston celebrate at commencement.

  The Art History department congratulates this year’s graduating BA students!

Olivia Baerga
Marisa Davila
Jennifer Dioguardi
Emma Fishbein
Emily Greenberg
Erin Livingston (honors)
Annemarie Maag-Tanchak
Keara McAdams
Lauren Rachel Poretsky
Thomas Rice
Sabrina Soffer

 

Emily Jelen receives President’s Award for Undergraduate Student Excellence

Congratulations to Art History major Emily Jelen, who has received the President’s Award for Undergraduate Student Excellence. The award recognizes students who have enriched the Binghamton University community through a record of accomplishment and leadership in such areas as scholarship, student life, and community life, all of which reflect the University’s purposes and priorities.

 

Undergraduate and Faculty Activities: University Art Museum Study Room Exhibit

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

The University Art Museum is currently displaying an exhibit demonstrating a range of nineteenth-century photographic formats and processes from the daguerreotype and the calotype paper process to the collodion wet-plate glass negative, the stereograph and the photogravure. The exhibit is in the Kenneth C. Lindsay Study Room and was organized in conjunction with ARTH 280, Distinguished Professor John Tagg’s course on “Histories of Photography.” The exhibit will be open for two weeks. A study guide is available in the exhibit.