New Fall Course: ARTH 284H-1917: Art of the Red Century

 

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Faculty Activities: Kevin Hatch at the Smithsonian American Art Museum

Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, D.C.

Kevin Hatch has been awarded a Short-Term Visitor Fellowship by the Smithsonian American Art Museum for fall 2017. The fellowship will allow him to spend two weeks this coming October in residence at the museum in Washington, D.C., working with its archival collections. The fellowship supports Hatch’s research proposal, “Intimacy and Exchange: Bay Area Art in the 1950s.”    

Faculty Activities: Kevin Hatch at Northwestern University in San Francisco

Endpapers for the first printing of The Psychedelic Experience (Timothy Leary, Ralph Metzner, and Richard Alpert, 1964), designed by Bruce Conner.

On July 28, Kevin Hatch delivered the paper “‘Where madness lies’: Bruce Conner, Timothy Leary, and The Psychedelic Experience” at the Summer of Love Conference 2017. The conference was held in recognition of the 50th anniversary of the Summer of Love in San Francisco. Northwestern University’s Center for Civic Engagement and the California Historical Society hosted the three-day, interdisciplinary academic conference to celebrate and reexamine the Summer of Love and its associated events, contexts, and implications. The conference took place at Northwestern University’s San Francisco campus.

Details on the conference can be found at http://www.engage.northwestern.edu/sfconference/about/.

Faculty and graduate activities: Nancy Um and Lauren Cesiro

In its June 2017 issue, The Art Bulletin is publishing reviews of six online collection catalogs issued by the National Gallery of Art, Washington DC; the Seattle Art Museum; the Arthur M. Sackler and Freer Gallery of Art, Washington DC; the Art Institute of Chicago; the Tate, United Kingdom; and the Walker Art Center, Minneapolis. This is the first time the quarterly journal has devoted its reviews section to digital scholarship.

Stephen H. Whiteman’s review of the Seattle Art Museum’s Chinese Painting & Calligraphy catalog is available now in an enhanced digital version, published on the Scalar platform and developed in collaboration with Nancy Um and Lauren Cesiro. The open-access project is at http://scalar.usc.edu/works/samosci/index.

Faculty Activities: Nancy Um in “Architectural Heritage of Yemen: Buildings that Fill my Eye”

The exhibition “Buildings that Fill my Eye”: Architectural Heritage of Yemen opens on July 13 at the Brunei Gallery, SOAS, University of London. The exhibition is accompanied by a catalog, which includes an essay by Nancy Um. For every copy sold 5 GBP will be donated to the UNHCR Yemen Emergency Appeal.

 

Alumni Activities: Kivanç Kilinç

Congratulations to Kivanç Kilinç (PhD 2010), who will be joining the American University of Beirut next year as Visiting Assistant Professor of Art and Architectural History in the Department of Architecture and Design. His research focuses on the transnational connections and their consequences, which shaped contemporary social housing practices in the Middle East. Other points of interest include domestic architectural culture in early twentieth century Turkey; Islamic art and architecture; and urban history and theory. Prior to his appointment at the AUB, Kilinç taught courses in architectural history, theory and criticism, as well as first year architectural design studio at Izmir University of Economics and Yaşar University in Turkey. Kilinç has published in journals such as The Journal of Architecture, New Perspectives on Turkey, and METU JFA, and is co-editor of a forthcoming book, Social Housing in the Middle East: Architecture, Urban Development, and Transnational Modernity (Indiana University Press, 2018). Currently he serves as the associate editor of The International Journal of Islamic Architecture (IJIA).

Graduate Activities: Melissa Fitzmaurice at the Society of Architectural Historians

Doctoral candidate Melissa Fitzmaurice presented a paper last Friday, June 9, as part of the panel Rethinking Medieval Rome: Architecture and Urbanism at the annual meeting of the Society of Architectural Historians in Glasgow, Scotland. Melissa was awarded the Gill Family Foundation Graduate Student Annual Conference Fellowship to support her travel to Glasgow.

Fascist Medievalism: Architecture, Authority, and Dissent in Rome

The demolitions involved in the excavation of the Mausoleum of Augustus and the creation of a surrounding piazza began on October 22, 1934, and eventually led to the destruction of 27,000 square meters within the city of Rome.[i]What was selected to remain is as important as what was destroyed: Mussolini routinely called for the isolation of ancient monuments, but in the case of the Mausoleum, there were buildings that stood in the way of the ideal isolation. Three medieval churches were protected and worked into the various plans for the piazzale over 30 years. Despite this and other cases, in the study of Italian Fascism and the regime’s urban and architectural interventions in Rome, the medieval city is often overlooked- the antique world looms much larger.  But the medieval offered a certain ideological utility to the regime as well, which must be examined.  Using digital mapping and modeling tools, and case studies including the preservation of medieval buildings during the production of the Piazzale Augusto Imperatore and the destruction of churches during the excavation of the Via dell’Impero, this project constitutes a palimpsestuous exploration of the legacy of medieval Rome. Beyond recognizing the use, manipulation, or destruction of medieval sites, this paper seeks to highlight the enduring power of medieval architecture on the Roman landscape, identifying the possibility or actuality of production of political and ecclesiastical authority, and dissent from that authority, in order to produce a deeper understanding of the continuities and ruptures between the medieval city, the fascist city, and the present.